Month: June 2016

LYMAN M. DAVIS

The retired wooden schooner LYMAN M. DAVIS was torched as a spectacle off the Sunnyside Amusement Park at Toronto and it burned to the waterline.
The LYMAN M. DAVIS, which rode triumphant through Great Lakes gales for more than half a century, was destroyed today as the feature show in a Sunnyside holiday spectacle.
Burned to the water’s edge and wracked by the explosions of powerful fireworks, the stout little schooner, which was born in a Muskegon shipyard 61 years ago, was towed to deep water shortly before 2 A.M. and sank by a dynamite charge in her bottom.
Only when the final act sent the vessel, hot and steaming, beneath the quite ripples of the outer bay, did the last of the many thousands of persons leave the amusement park. For more than an hour the great crowd stood fasinated by the roaring flames. They were more than fire-struck. They were held by the same type of spell which in olden days drew morbid crowds to the public Toronto hangings.
Even the most thoughtless of the watchers saw in the sinking vessel something more than the destruction of an inanimate thing. They had a feeling that out in the centre of the oil fed flames, the bursting bombs and roaring rockets, a personality, and what, until then, had been a living memory of inland sailing fleets, was quickly dying.
As a spectacle, the schooner’s burning was eminently satisfactory. The deck and holds had been piled high with dry wood and tinder like crates on Thursday, from a Western Gap pier head. Even in that the vessel’s destruction had the character of an execution. She was made to take that last short voyage, even as a condemned person is made to walk to the gallows, and she did in the ignominious tow of a sooty tug.
On the deck and in the rigging fireworks experts had placed powerful bombs and rockets. The last property for the fire set was placed late last night when men poured eight barrels of coal-oil through the ship.
Shortly before midnight a tug towed the LYMAN M. DAVIS from the Sunnyside anchorage, to a point about 300 yards beyond the sea-wall. The tug held her there at the length of a great cable.
The fire was set almost on the hour, and in a few moments the flames had roared along the oil trail from stem to stern and to the tops of her slender masts. As the fire burned into her vitals, the bombs and rockets were ignited.
The explosions fanned out great sheets and sparks and out from the burning ship rockets rose high and cut into the darkness of the upper sky.
All that remained of the schooner was towed out into deep water before the flames reached the waterline. To the late-stayers there came the sound of a muffled explosion. The fire again flared high and then quickly died into blackness.
The LYMAN M. DAVIS had ceased to amuse
Toronto Telegram
June 30, 1934

. . . . .

Schooner LYMAN M. DAVIS. U. S. No. 15934. Of 195.35 tons gross; 185.59 tons net. Built Muskegon, Mich, 1873. Home port, Muskegon, Mich. 123.0 x 27.2 x 9.4.
Merchant Vessel List, U. S., 1885

Canadian Number C 130436

The schooner LYMAN M. DAVIS has been sent to the Sturgeon Bay shipyard to be rebuilt during the winter. She has had a very busy season and though 30 years old the vessel earned $4,000 for her owners during the year,
Buffalo Evening News
December 11, 1903

Schooner LYMAN M. DAVIS. U. S. No. 15934. Of 195.35 tons gross; 185.59 tons net. Built Muskegon, Mich, 1873. Home port, Muskegon, Mich. 123.0 x 27.2 x 9.4.
Merchant Vessel List, U. S., 1885

Great story of the Davis
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~twigs2000/palmdavis.html

shots of her underwater
http://www.warrenlophotography.com/uw/humber/lyman-davis-2005/

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Categories: Boat Dive Advanced

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FRED A. MORSE

On 27 June 1892, in rain and fog, the FRED A. MORSE (wooden schooner, 182 foot, 592 gross tons, built in 1871, at Vermilion, Ohio) was being towed downbound by the HORACE A. TUTTLE (wooden propeller freighter, 250 foot, 1,585 gross tons, built in 1887, at Cleveland, Ohio) about 12 miles southeast of Thunder Bay on Lake Huron, both carrying loads of iron ore. At the same time, JOHN C. PRINGLE (wooden propeller freighter, 173 foot, 474 gross tons, built in 1880, at Detroit, Michigan) was sailing upbound in that vicinity with a load of coal and Italian marble with the schooners HARRISON, SWEETHEART and SUNSHINE in tow. At 1:30 a.m., the PRINGLE collided with the schooner MORSE, which sank in less than 15 minutes. The crew made it to the TUTTLE in the lifeboat, although one woman was badly injured. The PRINGLE’s bow was stove in, her deck planks forward were split and spread, her bulwarks torn away, and her anchors and foremast were lost. She cast off her tow and made for Alpena, Michigan, where she arrived later in the day.

SCHOONER “FRED MORSE” SUNK.
Alpena, June 28. – The propeller PRINGLE of Buffalo collided with the schooner FRED A. MORSE of Cleveland, 12 miles southeast of Thunder Bay Island at 1:30 o’clock yesterday morning. The MORSE was cut below water and sank in 200 feet in less than 25 minutes. The crew saved themselves by taking to the boat, and were afterwards picked up by the TUTTLE. One woman aboard the MORSE was badly injured. The MORSE was bound down, laden with iron ore, and was in tow of the propeller HORACE B. TUTTLE, which also had two other schooners. The TUTTLE proceeded on her way. The PRINGLE’s bow is badly damaged, her deck planks forward are split and spread, her bulwarks torn away for considerable distance, and she lost both anchors and her foremast. She is damaged several thousand dollars. She cast her tow adrift. It is not known what became of them, but they can probably take care of themselves. The PRINGLE started for Sand Beach, but the seas washed in through the hole in her bow, and she set about and made this port at 3:30 o’clock this afternoon.
At the time of the collision the mate was in charge and Capt. Bonnah was in his bunk, running out on deck, he was knocked overboard by the falling spar and his left hand was injured, but he managed to keep afloat for an hour, when he was picked up by a boat from the TUTTLE. He remained on board of her until daylight, when he was transferred on board his own boat. He was almost dead when picked up, and wishes to thank the officers of the TUTTLE for their kindness. It was raining at the time of the collision. There was some fog, but further than this the mate will make no statement of the cause of the collision.
Buffalo Inquirer
Wednesday, June 28, 1892
THE SCHOONER MORSE SUNK
Alpena, June 27. – The propeller Pringle, of Buffalo, collided with the schooner Fred A. Morse, of Cleveland, twelve miles southeast of Thunder Bay Island, at 1:30 this morning. The Morse was cut down below water and sank in 200 feet in less than 15 minutes. The crew saved themselves by taking to the boat and were afterward picked up by the Tuttle. One woman on board the Morse was badly injured. The Morse was bound down, laden with iron ore, and was in tow of the propeller Horace H. Tuttle, which also had two other schooners. The Tuttle proceeded on her way. The Pringle was bound from Buffalo to Chicago with a cargo of coal and Italian marble. She had in tow the schooners Harrison, Sweetheart and Sunshine. The Pringle’s bow is badly damaged, her deck planks forward are split and spread, her bulwarks torn away for a considerable distance, and she lost both anchors and her foremast. She is damaged several thousand dollars. She cast her tow adrift, and it is not known what became of them, but they probably can take care of themselves. The Pringle started to go to Sand Beach, but the seas washed in through the hole in her bow, and she set about and made this port about 5:30 this afternoon. At the time of the collision the mate was in charge. Capt. Bonnah, who was in his bunk, running out on deck, was knocked overboard by a falling spar. His left hand was injured, but he managed to keep afloat for an hour, when he was picked up by a boat from the Tuttle. He remained on board of her until daylight when he was transferred on board his own boat. He was almost dead when picked up and wishes to thank the officers of the Tuttle for their kindness. It was raining at the time of the collision and there was some fog, the further than this the parties will make no statement of the cause of the collision.
Detroit Free Press
June 28, 1892

. . . . .

The propeller PRINGLE of Buffalo collided with the schooner FRED A. MORSE of Cleveland 12 miles southeas of Thunder Bay Island at 1:30 o’clock Monday morning. The MORSE was cut down below the water line and sunk in 200 feet of water in less than 15 minutes. The crew were picked up by the TUTTLE. The MORSE was bound down with ore, in tow of the propeller HORACE M. TUTTLE. The PRINGLE was bound from Buffalo to Chicago with coal and Italian marble. She made Alpena in a severely damaged condition.
Port Huron Daily Times
Thursday, June 28, 1892

. . . . .

Cleveland, June 29. – The steamer H.A. TUTTLE arrived here last night with Capt. Fisher and the crew of the lost barge FRED MORSE on board. The crews of both the TUTTLE and MORSE were reticent regarding the cause of the collision. They said, however, that the MORSE sank in less than 5 minutes after she was struck. Most of the crew were in their bunks, including the cook and her daughter ?8 years old, and they had barely time to rush from their beds to the schooner’s yawl boat, before the vessel went down. One sailor failed to reach the boat and went down with the wreck. He was rescued by his mates the second time he rose to the surface.
The escape of the captain of the PRINGLE was the most remarkable. He is a large man, and after being knocked overboard found his feet so tangled in a line that he could not swim. He turned over on his back, and floated about for over an hour before assistance reached him.
Buffalo Enquirer
Thursday, June 29, 1892

. . . . .

Insurance on the sunken schooner FRED A. MORSE was placed in companies rerpresented by Crosby, McDonald & Co., to the extent of $9,500, while C. W. Elphicke & Co., had $2,833 and George McCurdy $2,000. These are all Chicago agencies. Proceedings are to be instituted against the steamer PRINGLE to recover this insurance, which aggregates $14,333
Buffalo Enquirer
July 1, 1892

. . . . .

Schooner FRED A. MORSE. U.S. No. 9980. Of 592.36 tons gross; 562.75 tons net. Built at Vermillion, Ohio in 1871. Home port, Cleveland, Ohio. 182.3 x 31.3 x 12.8
Merchant Vessel List, U.S., 1891

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Categories: General Nonsense

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W.P. THEW

On 22 June 1909, W.P. THEW (wooden propeller freighter, 133 foot, 207 gross tons, built in 1884, at Lorain, Ohio) was in ballast, creeping through the fog off Alpena, Michigan on Lake Huron when she was rammed by the WILLIAM LIVINGSTONE (steel propeller freighter, 532 foot, 6,634 gross tons, built in 1908, at Ecorse, Michigan). After the collision, the LIVINGSTONE drifted away and lost track of the THEW. The THEW sank in 80 feet of water. Fortunately the steamer MARY C. ELPHICKE answered the distress whistle and picked up the THEW’s crew from the lifeboat. No lives were lost.

GPS Location: N45° 02.705’ W83° 09.205’
Depth: 84 Feet
Wreck Length: 132 Feet Beam: 24 Feet
Gross Tonnage: 206 Cargo: None
Launched: 1884 by H.D. Root at Lorain, Ohio
Wrecked: June 22, 1909
Description: The W. P. Thew was one of about 700 19th-century Great Lakes steamers designed to carry forest products like logs, lumber, railroad ties, or shingles. After a 25-year career, Thew was lost in a “hit and run” accident. Just off Thunder Bay Island, the ship was struck in a fog by the 545-foot freighter William Livingston and sent to the bottom. The Livingston didn’t stop after the collision. Although the Thew sank quickly, no lives were lost. Today its remains lie splayed out on the bottom with all of the machinery and deck equipment displayed at the site.

SCOTIADOC

he SS Martin Mullen was launched as hull number 422 by American Ship Building Co. of Columbus.[1]

Career
The Martin Mullen made frequent trips to and from Duluth-area ports. She was purchased by Paterson Steamships in 1947 and renamed the Scotiadoc.

Final voyage
The Scotiadoc was rammed by Canadian steamer Burlington in heavy fog on June 20, 1953 off Trowbridge Island, near the Sleeping Giant in Lake Superior. One crew member died. Captain George Edgar Morris testified that he picked up the Burlington on radar when it was five miles away. The Burlington collided with the starboard side of the Scotiadoc near the stern.[2]

Discovery of shipwreck
Shipwreck hunters found the wreck in 2013. At a depth of 850 feet, it is among the deepest shipwrecks in the Great Lakes

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Categories: Lake Superior

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MAPLEGLEN x WYOMING

1925 – The wooden freighter MAPLEGLEN (i), is scuttled in Lake Ontario, west of Kingston, near Amherst Island. It had been idle since 1921 and was originally the WYOMING of 1881.

Identified by her boilers this scuttled wreck lays at N44 08 70 W76 37 09

Propeller MAPLEGLEN.* Official Canadian Number 141589. Built at Buffalo, N.Y., U.S.A. in 1887. Of 1492 gross tons; 911 tons reg. Home port, Montreal, Que. Owned by the Canada Steamship Lines, Montreal, Que. 250.4 x 40.1 x 14.6 and 100 horse power.
* Foreign name WYOMING.
List of Vessels on Registry Books of the Dominion
of Canada on the 31st. Day of December, 1920
mapleglen Steam screw WYOMING. U. S. No. 81150. Of 1,952.80 tons gross; 1,739.75 tons net. Built Buffalo, N.Y., 1887. Home port, Buffalo, N.Y. 241.0 x 39.9 x 14.9
Merchant Vessel List, U. S., 1891
mm prop mapleglen

MARINE NOTES. — Dispatches from Manitowoc indicate that the steamer WYOMING, aground near there, will be a total loss.

Buffalo Evening News

October 19, 1909

 

Propeller MAPLEGLEN.* Official Canadian Number 141589. Built at Buffalo, N.Y., U.S.A. in 1887. Of 1492 gross tons; 911 tons reg. Home port, Montreal, Que. Owned by the Canada Steamship Lines, Montreal, Que. 250.4 x 40.1 x 14.6 and 100 horse power.

* Foreign name WYOMING.

List of Vessels on Registry Books of the Dominion

of Canada on the 31st. Day of December, 1920

boilers mapleglen

Freighter MAPLEGLEN. Official Canada No. 141589. Of 1,492 gross tons. Built Buffalo, N.Y., 1887. 250 x 40 x 15 Ex U. S., WYOMING till 1920. DISPOSITION:– abandoned 1925
Preliminary List of Canadian Merchant Steamships
Inland & Coasta, 1809 to 1930. Worls Ship Society

Marine Notes:– The steamer WYOMING, bound for Chicago with steel, is on a reef near Manitou, Wis., and leaking. Her cargo will be lightered.

Buffalo Evening News

October 16, 1909

 

 

Etruria

1905 –ETRURIA sank after a collision with the AMASA STONE off Passage Island Light, Lake Superior.

http://www.greatlakessteamshipsociety.org/blog/etruria  contains video of the wreck

Steamer Etruria Sunk by a Stone

By James Donahue

Capt. George Mallory, skipper of the new ore carrier Amasa Stone, denied charges that he broke the rules of the lakes following an early morning collision that sank the freighter Etruria off Presque Isle Light.

The 23 crew members of the Etruria claimed that the Stone steamed off into the fog after a broadside collision that sank their coal laden boat on June 18, 1905. They said they barely had time to launch lifeboats and get off the boat before it turned upside down and went down by the stern in 68 fathoms of water.

Capt. John Green, master of the Etruria, also charged that the Stone may not have been traveling through the fog that morning in check, and he did not hear another boat’s fog signals prior to the crash.

Mallory denied the charges. He said the story of his alleged desertion was “a deliberate lie. After the collision we swung around and approached the Etruria, intending to offer her assistance. But the crew, taking to the boats, rowed off in the opposite direction,” he said.

In those days, boat captains faced fines of up to $1,000 and two years in jail if they filed to stop and pick up survivors following a collision that sank the other vessel.

At the time of the disaster, the 414-foot-long Etruria was considered the largest vessel ever to be sunk on the Great Lakes.

It was upbound that morning with a cargo of soft coal, moving from Toledo to a Lake Superior port. The Stone was steaming from Duluth with a cargo of iron ore, bound for Lake Erie.

When they hit, many of the crew members on the Etruria were asleep in their bunks. Chief Engineer B. B. Buchanan said he was awakened by the collision and thought the steamer had run aground. By the time he reached the deck, the vessel was already listing and starting to settle in the water, stern first.

The boat was gashed open on the starboard side, just abreast of the No. 9 hatch. Capt. John Green and his crew launched the boat’s lifeboats and escaped in time to watch the steamer roll over. As it turned upside down, the sailors said the hatch covers began breaking off and the cargo of coal rumbled free, dropping to the bottom of the lake ahead of the ship.

The crew was picked up later that morning by the passing steamer Maritana after the fog lifted.

The Stone was a new boat, having just been launched a few weeks before the accident.

The vessel was not having a good season. On its first trip the Stone went aground at Corsican shoal at the foot of Lake Huron.

The Etruria also was a relatively new boat, having been launched at Bay City in 1902, three years before it was lost.

Sault Ste. Marie, June 20. — Smith, Davis & Company agency held the insurance on the steamer ETRURIA, which was sunk by the AMASA STONE Sunday, amounting to $360,000. The cargo insurance was about $15,000. This will make one of the heaviest losses on one vessel ever known in Lake underwriting. Early in the season losses had reached such a figure as to make profit for underwriting for this year impossible and if no further disasters occur this year, the Underwriters are far enough behind now to make a large loss on the total business.
Buffalo Evening News
June 20, 1905
REPAIRS TO THE STONE. – Detroit, July 1, – Owing to the position of the damages on the steamer AMASA STONE, which recently sunk the ETRURIA in Lake Huron, the repair work is difficult and is progressing rather slowly. The big boat will probably not get away from Wyandotte for a week. Twenty-six plates had to be taken off the starboard bow in addition to the removal and replacing of 25 broken frames.
Buffalo Evening News
July 1, 1905

. . . . .

Investigation is still going on in the case of the AMASA STONE and ETRURIA, and thus far the preponderance of evidence seems to be against the STONE. The fact that 70 feet of one side of the ETRURIA was crushed in, causing her to sink within 5 minutes after she was struck, proves conclusively, so it is claimed, that the STONE must have been going full speed. If she had been going as she claims, under check, they would have simply come together and glanced off. Smith, Davis & Company have paid the ETRURIA loss of $275,000. This was accomplished within 30 days from the date of collision, which is a record. No effort probably be ever be made to raise the ETRURIA, or her cargo of coal, which lies between 300 and 400 feet under water. It is said that an action will be brought against the STONE, which promises a very vigorous contest.
Buffalo Evening News
August 16, 1905

. . . . .

PIONEER MARINE DECISION.
Detroit, June 9. – Judge Henry H. Swan, in the United States District Court, established a precedent in a suit brought by the Hawgood Transportation Company of Cleveland, owner of the steamer ETRURIA, to collect damages for the loss of that vessel, sunk in collision with the steamer AMASA STONE, in Lake Huron, June 18, 1905.
Sixteen insurance companies shared in the payment of a $205,000 loss on the ETRURIA.
Judge Swan holds that the non-contributing insurance companies may share only in any residue that remains after the 10 contributing companies have been paid their full percentage of the loss incurred through the sinking of the ETRURIA.
The ETRURIA and the AMASA STONE came together in a heavy fog about 10 miles off Presque Isle.
Buffalo Evening News
Friday, June 9, 1911

ETRURIA Built 1902 Bulk Propeller -Steel
U. S. No. 136977 4744 gt -4439 nt 414′ x 50′ x 24′
Sunk in collision with stmr. AMASA STONE June 18, 1905, 10 miles off Presque Isle Light, Lake Huron.
Frank Wheeler & Co., West Bay City Shipbuilding Master List
Institute for Great Lakes Research
Perrysburg, Ohio

Steam screw ETRURIA. U. S. No. 136977. Of 4,653 tons gross; 3,415 tons net. Built West Bay City, Mich. Home port, Cleveland, Ohio. 414.0 x 50.0 x 28.0 Of 1,500 indicated horsepower. Steel buil . Crew of 25.
Merchant Vessel List, U. S., 1903

MARINE
CHECKED DOWN BY UNCLE SAM
Vessel Masters Fined for Law Violation.
CAPTAINS WERE BLAMED
For Loss of the LINDEN, CITY OF ROME, and Big Freighter ETRURIA.
Federal authorities have taken drastic action in the collisions which occurred last season between the steamers ETRURIA and AMASA STONE and the CITY OF ROME and the LINDEN. Fines aggregating $1,200 have been imposed on two of the captains.
Capt. George B. Mallory, who sailed the steamer STONE, has been fined $1,000 for not standing by when his boat collided with and sank the steamer ETRURIA, near Detour. He has been notified of the fact and in case he does not pay the fine the alternative is two years in prison. The collision occurred on June 8.
Capt. John S. Morrison, who was master of the steamer WIDLAR, has been fined $200 without any alternative for causing the steamer LINDEN to sheer into the CITY OF ROME in violation of rule 22 of the steamboat laws. It is claimed that he passed two boats with the LINDEN in between and the suction resulted in the sheer. The LINDEN and the ROME went to the bottom as a result of the collision.
Both captains were tried before the United States inspectors at Port Huron and found guilty of violating the steamboat rules. The inspectors made their report to Collector Leach, the boats being owned in this district.
The STONE’s collision resulted in a property loss estimated at $283,189.81, but this is not figured in the fines. It is owing to the fact that the STONE did not wait to render assistance to the ETRURIA’s crew, thereby endangering their lives on the open lake.
The LINDEN sheered into the CITY OF ROME June 23. She was up-bound with a cargo of coal and the CITY OF ROME was coming down with a load of ore. The impact of the collision was so hard that it sent both boats to the bottom. The ROME was afterwards raised, but the LINDEN is still on the bottom. It is considered a menace to navigation.

Grecian

GRECIAN (steel propeller freighter, 296 foot, 2,348 gross tons, built in 1891, at Cleveland, Ohio by Globe Iron Works (Hull#40) struck a rock near Detour, Michigan, on 7 June 1906, but made dock at Detour before settling on bottom. After her cargo was removed, she was raised, and towed by her fleet mate SIR HENRY BESSEMER, bound for Detroit Shipbuilding Co. in Wyandotte, Michigan, for repairs, relying on air pressure in her sealed holds to keep her afloat. However, on 15 June 1906, her holds began to fill with water and she sank in Lake Huron off Thunder Bay. Her crew was rescued by SIR HENRY BESSEMER

GPS Location: N44° 58.109’ W83° 12.057’
Depth: 100 Feet (Stern Deck at 75 Feet)
Wreck Length: 296 Feet Beam: 40 Feet
Gross Tonnage: 2348 Cargo: None
Launched: 1891 by Globe Iron Works at Cleveland, Ohio
Wrecked: June 15, 1906
Description: On June 7, 1906 the Grecian struck a rock and sank in shallow water
at Detour Village in the St. Mary’s River. The ship was later refloated and taken in
tow by the steamer Sir Henry Bessemer, en route to Detroit for repairs.
Unexpectedly, it filled with water and sank near Thunder Bay Island. Its crew
escaped in lifeboats. Today the Grecian’s bow and stern lie intact, while the midships
portion has collapsed. The engine, boiler, portions of the propeller and deck
machinery are all in place. There is also a steel canalon (salvage lifting device)
lying off the vessel’s stern from a 1909 salvage attempt.

A great 3d webpage on the Grecian is here.

 

STEAMER GRECIAN WILL BE RAISED AT ONCE.
Detour, June 8. — The tug THOMPSON, with a lighter, arrived here yesterday afternoon to take off the cargo of the GRECIAN, which is sunk in 21 feet of water. The extent of the injuries to the steamer has not yet been ascertained
Buffalo Evening News
Friday, June 8, 1906

. . . . .

WILL COST $50,000TO REPAIR STR ZIMMERMAN.
Cleveland, June 9. — It will take at least two months for the Lake Shipyards to complete repairs on the steel vessels now lined up waiting to go into drydocks. The steamer ZIMMERMAN, which was sunk in collision with the SAXONA in the Soo Passage on her first trip, will be at the local shipyard for seven or eight weeks, and the repair bill will be between $50,000 and $60,000. The steamer CRESCENT CITY and barge MANILA, recently released from the beach near Duluth, will be repaired at Ohio ports and they will both be big jobs.
The MANILA will be converted into a steamer, but the change will not be made until next winter. Repairs on the MATAAFA will probably be made at Superior. Little will be known regarding the condition of the EDENBORN until she has been released at Split Rock. The steamers ROMAN, recently released, and the GRECIAN, now sunk at Detour, will have to go into drydock for repairs.
Buffalo Evening News
Saturday, June 9, 1906

. . . . .

The North American Salvage Wrecking Company has begun preparations for raising the sunken ore barge GRECIAN, which went down in Thunder bay during a gale two years ago.
Buffalo Evening News
July 27, 1909

. . . . .

The sunken steamer GRECIAN was located by divers 16 miles off Alpena yesterday. She is in good condition and valued at $100,000
Buffalo Evening News
August 25, 1909

. . . . .

Steam screw GRECIAN. U. S. No. 86136. Of 2,348 tons gross. Built 1891. On June 15, 1906, vessel foundered in Lake Huron. With 20 persons on board. No lives lost.
Loss of American Vessels reported During Fiscal Year, 1906

Steam screw GRECIAN. U. S. No. 86136. Of 2,348 tons gross; 1,875 tons net. Built Cleveland, Ohio, 1891. Home port, Duluth, Minn. 296.2 x 40.4 x 21.1 Crew of 20. Steel built. Of 1,280 indicated horsepower. Passenger service.
Merchant Vessel List, U. S., 1904

Dredge Islander

Located at N44 11 692 W76 34 215 this small wreck was located by a Mike Powell.   The Islander was a dredge barge and was discarded after the Portsmouth harbour cleanup during the 1930’s.

Stripped of almost everything useful she was towed to her present location and remained there till found.  In 2003 a quick photo survey and sketch was made.

 

arm belowdeck

Zephyr

ZEPHYR Schooner, cargo coal; sprung a leak in Lake Erie; a total loss.
Marine Disasters on the Western
Lakes during 1869, Capt. J.W. Hall
On Thursday night (6/10) the schr. ZEPHYR bound from this port for Detroit, with a cargo of 250 tons of coal, sprung a leak when about 15 miles off Long Pt., filled rapidly and sunk in 20 fathoms of water. The crew took to the yawl, and pulled to Grand River, where they arrived in safety. The vessel and cargo are fully insured.
Buffalo Morning Express
June 12, 1869 1-8
We learn that the schr. ZEPHYR bound to Detroit, sprang a leak during the heavy wind of the 10th, and finally sunk below Long Pt. She was loaded with coal for Detroit and will without doubt prove a total loss. The crew reached Grand River in safety, but very much exhausted, after pumping 18 hours in an open boat.
Detroit Free Press
June 13, 1869 4-7
We learn that the schr. ZEPHYR which left this port for Detroit with 250 tons of coal, sprung a leak Thursday afternoon and sunk in 25 fathoms of water 15 miles east of Long Pt. All hands were saved. They took to their boat and pulled down to Grand River, Ontario. The ZEPHYR we believe is fully insured.
Buffalo Daily Courier
June 14, 1869 3-3

ZEPHYR; 1856; Schooner; US28018

Vessel Name
ZEPHYR
Build Year
1856
Official Number
US28018
Construction Build City
Trenton & Detroit
Build State
MI
Vessel Type
Schooner
Number of Decks
1
Hull Materials
Wood
Builder Name
G. Cantin or Cantair
Ownership
Original Owner
E.W. Hudson
Original Owner Location
Detroit
Power (Sail)
Sail Number Masts
2
Power (Mechanical)

Dimensions
Length
101
Beam
23
Depth
9
Tonnage Old Style
191.56
Tonnage Gross
143.57
Final Disposition
Final Location
15 miles east of Long Point, Lake Erie
Final Date Month
10
Final Date Day
6
Final Date Year
1869
Final How
Foundered in gale
History and Notes
History
1862 Repaired
1863 Owned J. Johnson, Port Huron, Michigan
1865 144 gross tons
1866 Owned H. Harbeck, Cleveland, Ohio
1868 143.57 gross tons
1869, June 10 Foundered, Lake Erie

 

It is not known if this wreck has been located.

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Categories: Lake Eire

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Mark 1

Located at N 44’12.115 W 76’31.705.  Mark was a guy hanging around the charter operations and wreck hunters in the 70s/80s and was interested in learning how to locate wrecks.  So they taught him a few secrets and sent him out to practice.

Mark returns a few hours later with this first confirmed wreck.  This little tug boat in 60 feet of water out side of Portsmouth harbour near snake island.

This is obviously an abandoned wreck.  In the 80’s a POW survey was conducted and the wreck was forgotten about till 2003.mark1 marksterntop1